Land East of Knoll Road

We attended an evening meeting of the council just before the Corona ‘lockdown’ began.  On a table in one of the committee rooms (we shouldn’t have been there…) we saw this poster, and managed to take a quick photo.  As the title says, the poster is a plan of the ‘Land East of Knoll Road’.

There was an explanatory document next to the poster, but we didn’t have time to copy it.  However, – as far as we can remember – this is what it said:

The council has obtained funding from One Public Estate (https://www.local.gov.uk/topics/housing-planning-and-homelessness/one-public-estate) to develop the whole area enclosed by the red line on the plan.  As the name implies, the site will become one large housing estate.  An investigation is underway – the ‘Surrey Heath Estate Development Study’  – to maximise the amount of housing within the area.

The obvious question is ‘to where will the council go when the current offices are demolished?’ Well, as we’ve predicted before, the new council accommodation will be in the London Road Block.  But, what we’d not anticipated is that, demonstrating the council’s commitment to the Climate Emergency, the former Allders building will be repurposed, rather than be demolished.  The council will occupy it, along with Huawei, the council’s new 5G partner.  The current energy-inefficient shop windows will be replaced by military-grade concrete blocks, and just one entrance will be retained, strengthened by additional security features.

Apparently there will be no need for any public access to the building.  Extensive surveillance equipment, linked to aerials and satellite dishes on the roof, will monitor every person throughout south east England.  Consequently, all communications, movements and even thoughts within the borough, and any criticism of the council, will be detected immediately.  Correction squads will visit those involved, at any hour of the day and night, to adjust residents’ behaviours as deemed necessary by the authorities.

Once the redevelopment has been completed, the obsolete slogan ‘Camberley, Be Inspired’ will be dropped.  It will be replaced by ‘Camberley, Be Afraid’.  Be very afraid!

Have we missed something?

At last we’ve got around to looking at the latest Heathscene.  (Why can’t it be DOWNLOADED?)  And here’s an extract:

So, the Ashwood House development is “nearly complete”.  But last time we looked – and, because of ‘lockdown’ that was a little time ago – the building was still lacking the two new  top floors.  Is Heathscene being a bit on the optimistic side?

A dangerous stumble

More than once when we’ve crossed Knoll Road we’ve stumbled a bit.  Which, if there’s traffic approaching, isn’t a good idea.  So we’ve stopped and asked ‘Why?’.  The answer is obvious – there are two ‘kerbs’, one on top of the other.  If you’re watching out for vehicles, rather than looking at your feet, it’s quite easy to miss the above-average drop from the pavement to the road surface.  Is this hazard inevitable, or could better design have avoided it?  Whatever the answer, take care crossing the road!

Is anyone from Waterfords reading this?

We’re showing two photos today.  One of a broken Waterfords advertising hoarding at the top of the High Street, where it’s been for quite a while, and the other showing where it was originally fixed – at the top of Park Street.

We would have simply e-mailed these photos to Waterfords suggesting that they retrieve the advertisement.  But it turns out that the only way to send them an e-mail is to complete an on-line form.  Even then, it might not be possible to attach the rather necessary photos.  So we’ll try via the Eye instead.

High Street – work is on-going

The Eye doesn’t wander about very much at the moment!  A little pest just ninety billionths of a metre across is to blame.  So we’re grateful to Paul for sending us this picture of the High Street yesterday, showing that work is still underway.  We were slightly surprised to see so many workers, including a few apparently fairly close to each other.  But this seems to be within the ‘rules’.  (If you’re interested in the ‘Corvid procedures’ for construction work – and you probably aren’t! – just click HERE.)

It’s sobering to realise that most of the shops in Paul’s photo are closed.

 

Compass House – visibly changing

From time to time over the years we’ve mentioned the intended conversion of Compass House – on the A30 – into flats.  Last autumn we showed hoardings being erected at the back of the site.  Well, six months or so later, work is well underway, with scaffolding at both the front and the back of the building.  (Why, we wonder, has just half of the front been scaffolded?)

Arena – catching up

We’d forgotten that we’d taken a photo of the Arena site a week ago, when some form of cladding was just being installed around the curved corner of the building.  (When we pointed our camera, we got a cheery wave from the workers that you can just about see on their elevated platform.)

But worse, we’d overlooked that Mark had sent us a photo a whole two weeks ago.  It was taken from the Atrium car park – pretty obviously, it was raining at the time.

So, with apologies to Mark, here are the two photos.  You’ll be able to tell which one’s which.

 

Challenge 70

You know about ‘Challenge 25’ – the requirement for clubs and pubs to ask for proof that a young person is old enough to buy alcoholic drinks.

Well, in the current circumstances, will the local Age Concern Rainbow Café, if it’s still open, implement ‘Challenge 70’, and ask customers for proof that they’re not too old?  (If they’re over 70,they should be self-isolating at home!!)